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I know everyone is calling it crap and pretentious, but I loved it. I can admit, it’s arty, it’s pretentious, it’s pure. I feel like I could describe the films of Robert Bresson or Federico Fellini or Michael Haneke with any of these adjectives, but does that make them bad movies? Some, maybe. I’d be cautious recommending any of their movies to the Average Joe Movie Buff, though, because each of these directors’ films are employed with their trademark styles. If you can’t sink you’re teeth into the films instantly or don’t have an idea what the movies are about, you’re a goner. Which would explain why I had such a difficult time with movies like Lancelot du Lac or 8 1/2 when I first saw them in my teens.

A couple weeks ago, Youth Without Youth only played in town for a week (even though it was released in America at the end of last year), so I only got the chance to see it once. I’d love to see it again, though. I loved the way Coppola chose to express his feelings on memory, love, and vitality in abstract terms, considering he is dealing with abstract notions. So far, seeing this was the film event of the year–at least in a city like New Orleans, which doesn’t get much in the way of limited releases in the theater.

I can’t write an in-depth review of the film anytime in the near future, and even if I could, I really don’t want to say too much. Just see the movie! Youth Without Youth may be in a theater near you, but if it’s not (or if it’s about to leave your local cineplex), it’s coming to DVD next month.

Any thoughts from anyone who’s seen it? I know I can’t be the only one who liked it. Ari from The Aspect Ratio put it #10 on his Top Ten of 2007 list, so I don’t feel too left out. His “review,” although brief, is spot-on.

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One Comment

  1. I rlllllllly want to see this, and your quasi-review only helped to make that wildfire bigger. :)


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